Browse Prior Art Database

Kit for Assembling Logic into Logic Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093854D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miller, RB: AUTHOR

Abstract

This method and apparatus reduces the time, errors and tedium involved in the detailed design of logic such as is used in computers. It also eliminates the keypunching and other clerical steps associated with getting design information into machine readable form, either for design automation or circuit simulation.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Kit for Assembling Logic into Logic Design

This method and apparatus reduces the time, errors and tedium involved in the detailed design of logic such as is used in computers. It also eliminates the keypunching and other clerical steps associated with getting design information into machine readable form, either for design automation or circuit simulation.

Small, flat modules simulate each of the fundamental building blocks of logic such as And, Or, Exclusive-Or and Invert. Status conditions are simulated by lights of one color or another at each input and output. The devices are shaped and coded so that their function, interconnections and positions are automatically machine readable. This eliminates any drawing or drafting for users who have design automation facilities.

The logic designer usually approaches a design problem that results in hundreds or thousands of decision elements by creating a flow chart of his concept of the logical organization. From this, he prepares the detailed drawings of the And's, Or's and Inverts and their logical connectives which specify circuit functions and wiring functions. During design, a clerical task is that of keeping in mind, or figuring out, the various up and down conditions of signals representing the logical blocks in action. The designer also has difficulty in keeping in mind complex timing patterns among these elements. He must now do this from paper. Inevitably he makes many errors, and cleanup cycles are costly and consuming of time. Minimizing his logic, or patterning it to reduce wire length, or making functional changes now requires extensive transcriptions of data. So does the preparation for computer simulation of logic and timing.

Using this method and apparatus, the designer has before him a large board containing a matrix of female plugs. From bins he selects the modules which are shape-coded to distinguish their logical functions. He plugs the module into the board. With additional modules and suitable plug wires to connect them the designer builds up logic, just as he otherwise does with paper and pencil.

At any stage, the designer can test the logical validity of his design by pressing a switch on the matrix board which controls a desired input. Each module is an electronic relay. If an input to the module is on, a light at its base glows. If the input is off, there is no light. The same holds true for its outputs.

For long connections, a line is led to special rows and columns of sockets in the matrix board, inserted into an identifier plug which in turn is inserted into the board. Connection to an output plug having the same identification can be effected by inserting...