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Making Holograms Using Brewster's Angle

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093863D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ross, RM: AUTHOR

Abstract

This is a method of making a hologram. The result is that the observer obtains a greater angle of view of the 3-D object. A higher resolution of the image is also obtained. The hologram is made by placing object 10, to be recorded, quite close to photographic plate 12 and illuminating it by reflecting plane polarized coherent light 14 from glass surface 16 of plate 12 opposite emulsion 18. Beam 14 is directed toward plate 12 at angle 20, which is Brewster's angle for the material involved, i.e., glass/air = 56 degrees 40'. By deviating slightly from Brewster's angle or by rotating the plane of polarization of beam 14, the latter can be made to vary from total reflection to mostly transmission through glass 16 to emulsion 18. In this manner, the optimum light ratio, carrier beam/light from object, is obtained.

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Making Holograms Using Brewster's Angle

This is a method of making a hologram. The result is that the observer obtains a greater angle of view of the 3-D object. A higher resolution of the image is also obtained. The hologram is made by placing object 10, to be recorded, quite close to photographic plate 12 and illuminating it by reflecting plane polarized coherent light 14 from glass surface 16 of plate 12 opposite emulsion 18. Beam 14 is directed toward plate 12 at angle 20, which is Brewster's angle for the material involved, i.e., glass/air = 56 degrees 40'. By deviating slightly from Brewster's angle or by rotating the plane of polarization of beam 14, the latter can be made to vary from total reflection to mostly transmission through glass 16 to emulsion 18. In this manner, the optimum light ratio, carrier beam/light from object, is obtained.

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