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Typewriter with Electronic Separation of Input

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093928D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Becker, FE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The drawing shows a typewriter with transmission capabilities in which overlap of keyed-in signals is prevented by electronic circuits. The character keys of the typewriter are mechanically interlocked as is now done in many typewriters. However, the touch and speed of the typist are impaired and the physical structures are greatly extended if the function keys are also physically interlocked. The function keys are therefore not physically interlocked, but all keyed-in data is separated by providing a serial, electronic memory in which all signals keyed in are stored. The storage related to character signals is essentially only with regard to timing of the start of each signal.

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Typewriter with Electronic Separation of Input

The drawing shows a typewriter with transmission capabilities in which overlap of keyed-in signals is prevented by electronic circuits. The character keys of the typewriter are mechanically interlocked as is now done in many typewriters. However, the touch and speed of the typist are impaired and the physical structures are greatly extended if the function keys are also physically interlocked. The function keys are therefore not physically interlocked, but all keyed-in data is separated by providing a serial, electronic memory in which all signals keyed in are stored. The storage related to character signals is essentially only with regard to timing of the start of each signal.

The keyboard is in the usual external form. Depression of a character key is very much as in previous structures in that the character selected is represented and stored for a time by the movement of an interposer or other part in the typewriter. As distinguished from previous structures, a typewriter cycle to print the character is not initiated by key depression. Instead, this is initiated by a signal associated with the serial register as is explained. The depression of a character key causes a signal useful only to start a character cycle to be stored in the next available stage of the serial register.

Depression of a function key merely closes a switch associated with that key. Each function, i. e., backspace, shift, carrier return, etc., can be associated with a single magnet driver in the typewriter. Therefore, no elaborate coding is required. A single pulse indicative by its position of the function key depressed is read into the next available stage of the serial register.

In operation two keyboard keys can be depressed in near succession. If the first key is a function key, the following key can be a function key or a character key. The time of execution of the actions associated with both keys is controlled by the serial register as is explained. The unique information of any character key depressed is stored mechanically in the printer. The unique information of any function key depressed is stored in the serial register. A second character key cannot be depressed before a first character key is acted upon because the physical interlock previously mentioned positively prevents this. Any reasonable number of function keys can be freely depressed, however. This can be true even if a prior depressed function key is still depressed. Therefore, a one-look feat...