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Browse Prior Art Database

Electrophotographic Light Amplifier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093949D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Keyes, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

The light amplifier of A includes a four-layer structure made up of a pair of outer electrodes 1 and 4 between which a layer of photoconductive material 3 and a layer of Stark modulator material 2 are formed. The term Stark modulator is here used to describe those materials whose optical absorption coefficient or index of refraction can be changed by an electrical field. The operation is similar to xerography differing in that the image exposed on the photoconductor is developed and reproduced using the Stark modulator material instead of a toner.

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Electrophotographic Light Amplifier

The light amplifier of A includes a four-layer structure made up of a pair of outer electrodes 1 and 4 between which a layer of photoconductive material 3 and a layer of Stark modulator material 2 are formed. The term Stark modulator is here used to describe those materials whose optical absorption coefficient or index of refraction can be changed by an electrical field. The operation is similar to xerography differing in that the image exposed on the photoconductor is developed and reproduced using the Stark modulator material instead of a toner.

Light at a wavelength which passes through electrode 1 and layer 2 is applied in the form of the pattern to be processed to the surface 3A of photoconductor 3. It is assumed that this surface is initially charged and the light pattern selectively discharges portions of the surface to form a charge image of the light input pattern. As a result of the discharge the electrical field across the modulator, layer 2 varies in accordance with the light input pattern. A light input is then applied at a wavelength for which the optical transparency of layer 2 varies with the applied electric field to reproduce the input pattern.

Surface 3A can be charged by applying a voltage across electrodes 1 and 4 which is sufficient to nondestructively break down the insulating properties of layer 2. As shown in the right-hand drawing, the four-layer structure can be formed in the region between rollers AA...