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Three Dimensional Displays Utilizing Multiple Source Moire Patterns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093960D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCurry, RE: AUTHOR

Abstract

The location effect of multiple source moire patterns can be utilized to display information in a form having depth.

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Three Dimensional Displays Utilizing Multiple Source Moire Patterns

The location effect of multiple source moire patterns can be utilized to display information in a form having depth.

The information to be displayed is recorded on source surface 1 consisting of a suitable light-emitting, light-scattering or diffusing surface, in the form of localized horizontal spacing, i.e., dark regions, between light-emitting or scattering-spots or vertical lines. Spaced away from surface 1 and parallel to it is view grid 2. The latter is in the form of a planar horizontally periodic array of transparent holes or slits in an otherwise opaque sheet of material. The viewer looks at surface 1 through view grid 2. Light arriving at the viewer's eyes from localized areas of surface 1 diverges from a real or virtual associated moire pattern and therefore appears to have originated at this location in space. The moire pattern location with respect to surface 1 is given by f = (d divided by 2) >1 + b+a) divided by (b - a)|.

In the equation, b is the source grid period, a the view grid 2 period, and d is the separation between surface 1 and view grid 2. If f>0, the moire pattern is located in front of view grid 2. If f<0, it is located behind view grid 2.

Surface 1 can be a photographic positive or negative to which depth information has been added by appropriate opaque masking, a drawing in which depth information has been included, or the face of a cathode ray tube on which the necessary depth information has been recorded electronically.

The two-dimensional information occurs in its usual form, except for the added depth modulation, as an intensity modulation over an area. This intensity modulation is repeated in the moire pattern. The two-di...