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Microwave Oscillator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000093999D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dumke, WP: AUTHOR

Abstract

The oscillator employs the Gunn effect to produce microwave oscillation and is formed of a body of N-type GaAs 10 having ohmic contacts 12 and 14 on opposite ends of the body. The voltage supply is connected across these contacts. Oscillations are produced in the device by the nucleation and propagation of domains of high field concentration. These domains are nucleated in a high field region adjacent the contact 12 to which the negative terminal of the voltage supply is connected and normally propagate to a point adjacent the positive contact 14 where they are extinguished.

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Microwave Oscillator

The oscillator employs the Gunn effect to produce microwave oscillation and is formed of a body of N-type GaAs 10 having ohmic contacts 12 and 14 on opposite ends of the body. The voltage supply is connected across these contacts. Oscillations are produced in the device by the nucleation and propagation of domains of high field concentration. These domains are nucleated in a high field region adjacent the contact 12 to which the negative terminal of the voltage supply is connected and normally propagate to a point adjacent the positive contact 14 where they are extinguished.

When contacts such as 12 and 14 are formed by alloying techniques, a recrystallized region adjacent the negative contacts is produced which is degenerately doped and has a relatively low resistivity. This region is, therefore, not conducive to the production of the high electric field necessary for domain nucleation. In the structure shown, prior to the formation of the alloy contacts, a fairly deep but low concentration diffusion of an acceptor impurity is made through the end surfaces to obtain impurity profile indicated.

The acceptor impurity partly compensates the donor concentration and furnishes a region at each end of the device which has a higher resistivity and in which domains can be easily nucleated. Though a symmetrical structure is shown it is only necessary to compensate the material and form the high resistivity region in that portion of the material usuall...