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Increasing the Effectiveness of Bias Sputtering

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094029D
Original Publication Date: 1966-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davidse, PD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Bias sputtering has been impractical for sputtering high resistivity materials. This is because a relatively thick film has to be built up on the substrate before it becomes effective. This problem is overt come by bias sputtering apparatus 1. Substrates 2, top plate 3, cathode 4 and anode 5 are conventionally positioned in bell jar 6. Plate 7 has conduits 8 and 9 for, respectively, generating a vacuum within jar 6 and admitting inert gas to it. An RF voltage is applied through capacitive coupling 10 to the back of substrates 2 instead of the usual bias voltage. A negative potential builds up on the substrate surface during operation of apparatus 1. This is due to differences in electron and ion mobility. This potential essentially takes the place of the standard DC bias.

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Increasing the Effectiveness of Bias Sputtering

Bias sputtering has been impractical for sputtering high resistivity materials. This is because a relatively thick film has to be built up on the substrate before it becomes effective. This problem is overt come by bias sputtering apparatus 1. Substrates 2, top plate 3, cathode 4 and anode 5 are conventionally positioned in bell jar 6. Plate 7 has conduits 8 and 9 for, respectively, generating a vacuum within jar 6 and admitting inert gas to it. An RF voltage is applied through capacitive coupling 10 to the back of substrates 2 instead of the usual bias voltage. A negative potential builds up on the substrate surface during operation of apparatus 1. This is due to differences in electron and ion mobility. This potential essentially takes the place of the standard DC bias. The end result is that even high resistivity films are sputtered continuously while they are being built up.

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