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Stripping Photoresist Films After Sputter Etching

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094121D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Esch, RP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method facilitates the stripping of photoresist films after they have been exposed to ion bombardment during sputter etching processes. In sputter etching processes, a photoresist film, developed to form a pattern is used to mask portions of a layer on a substrate that is to be sputter-etched. The photoresist layer protects selected portions of the substrate from being eroded away by the ion bombardment. Frequently, photoresist layers are difficult to remove after being exposed to the ionic bombardment.

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Stripping Photoresist Films After Sputter Etching

This method facilitates the stripping of photoresist films after they have been exposed to ion bombardment during sputter etching processes. In sputter etching processes, a photoresist film, developed to form a pattern is used to mask portions of a layer on a substrate that is to be sputter-etched. The photoresist layer protects selected portions of the substrate from being eroded away by the ion bombardment. Frequently, photoresist layers are difficult to remove after being exposed to the ionic bombardment.

This process involves forming a layer of polyvinyl formal resin directly over the substrate layer to be sputtered in underlying relation to the photoresist layer. In practice, the polyvinyl formal resin layer is formed on the substrate. A photoresist layer is applied over the polyvinyl formal resin layer, exposed and developed. The resultant composite element is sputter-etched. The photoresist and polyvinyl formal resin are removed by ultrasonically treating the substrate in ethylene dichloride.

The underlying polyvinyl formal resin layer permits the photoresist film to float away from the substrate and also reduces bubbling in the photoresist material. Bubbles in the photoresist result in a thinner section protecting the underlayer. This reduced protection does not withstand prolonged ion bombardment and consequently undesirable etching of the underlay results in the bubble areas.

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