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Forming the Overlying Layer of MnO(2) on Ta(2)O(5) Capacitor Dielectric Layers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094193D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Valletta, RM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method makes possible the deposition of MnO(2) films of improved quality in the fabrication of capacitors embodying tantalum oxide dielectric layers. In the manufacture of tantalum thin-film capacitors, it is well known to apply a layer of MnO(2) over the tantalum oxide dielectric layer. The MnO(2) layer functions to seal the layer of tantalum oxide closing pinholes, etc. This greatly reduces the probability of developing shorts between the electrode layers. The MnO(2) layer is conventionally deposited by spraying an aqueous solution of Mn(NO(3))(2).

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Forming the Overlying Layer of MnO(2) on Ta(2)O(5) Capacitor Dielectric Layers

This method makes possible the deposition of MnO(2) films of improved quality in the fabrication of capacitors embodying tantalum oxide dielectric layers. In the manufacture of tantalum thin-film capacitors, it is well known to apply a layer of MnO(2) over the tantalum oxide dielectric layer. The MnO(2) layer functions to seal the layer of tantalum oxide closing pinholes, etc. This greatly reduces the probability of developing shorts between the electrode layers. The MnO(2) layer is conventionally deposited by spraying an aqueous solution of Mn(NO(3))(2).

In this method, the MnO(2) layer is deposited by spraying a solution. of Mn(NO(3))(2), water, and a volatile solvent. Suitable volatile solvents are ethanol, propanol, acetone, etc. The preferred solution consists of 35 parts water, 35 parts methyl alcohol, and 2 parts of 50% Mn(NO(3))(2) and water.

The improvement in the quality of MnO(2) film is the result of several factors. Such include the increased volatility of the subject solution over aqueous solutions, the decreased surface tension resulting in finer spray and less droplet formation, and the change in the rate at which MnO(2) is formed due to the presence of volatile solvent.

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