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Force Free Insertion and Removal of Circuit Cards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094195D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Abbatecola, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

These socket card receivers deal with the problem of insertion and withdrawal of printed circuit cards from a receiver socket where the cards have many contact terminals. The cooperation of spring fingers with them makes it difficult or impossible to exert the required insertion or retraction force should each contact have a required amount of pressure. These devices eliminate the inconvenience and unreliability of air pressure operated contacts as well as the high forces and strain of cam operated contacts retain the small insertion force and withdrawal forces of an improved arrangement.

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Force Free Insertion and Removal of Circuit Cards

These socket card receivers deal with the problem of insertion and withdrawal of printed circuit cards from a receiver socket where the cards have many contact terminals. The cooperation of spring fingers with them makes it difficult or impossible to exert the required insertion or retraction force should each contact have a required amount of pressure. These devices eliminate the inconvenience and unreliability of air pressure operated contacts as well as the high forces and strain of cam operated contacts retain the small insertion force and withdrawal forces of an improved arrangement.

As shown at the upper left, a strip or band of rubber 10 is mounted within slotted TEFLON* sleeve 11, the length of card 14 and behind contacts 12 in receiver 13. Then tension is applied to strip 10 to stretch it and narrow its girth relative to the socket opening 15. Thus contacts 12 in socket 15 have more play and there is less resistance to the insertion of pins 16 of card 14. After pins 16 are inserted, as at the upper right, the tension is released allowing strip 10 to return to the original large cross-section shape. Strip 10 expands and thus pushes against the side of contacts 12 to force them against pins 16 of card 14. The purpose of slippery sleeve 11 is to allow free action of strip 10 in catching on the sides of contacts 12 as it would should there be direct rubber pressure. In order to remove a card or inserted pins...