Browse Prior Art Database

Document Location With Convenient Keyboard

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094198D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, CF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This is an entry system for an automatic document filing and retrieval system using a ten key keyboard and both alphabetic and numeric symbols. This input system is convenient to the machine operator. This is because the descriptive inputs used are based upon the standard, natural words and numbers found on or in connection with the document.

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Document Location With Convenient Keyboard

This is an entry system for an automatic document filing and retrieval system using a ten key keyboard and both alphabetic and numeric symbols. This input system is convenient to the machine operator. This is because the descriptive inputs used are based upon the standard, natural words and numbers found on or in connection with the document.

The output of this system in a retrieval mode is one or more numbers representative of documents desired. The actual documents are then found directly because they are stored in numerical order. Inputs descriptive of basic features of the content of the documents desired are entered into data processing equipment. The document numbers are found by automatic comparisons made by a data processing system. In the filing mode, the descriptive inputs are entered into the data processing memory for subsequent use in a retrieval mode.

The ten key keyboard used is preferably a push button tone generator almost entirely similar to the presently known telephone dialer of the same kind. The alphabet is associated with these keys as shown in the drawing. Thus, each key is representative of one number and several letters of the alphabet.

Two symbols for each descriptor are generally sufficient to adequately distinguish that descriptor from others. This is because a document is generally retrieved on a search for identity with several descriptors. The table indicates the immediate and easily found...