Browse Prior Art Database

Cable Switch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094259D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beausoleil, WF: AUTHOR

Abstract

This manually controlled cable switch is made up of mercury switching elements in a three-dimensional modular array. The state of several crosspoints can be changed at the same time by an air pressure control and can be used for I/O channel switching.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Cable Switch

This manually controlled cable switch is made up of mercury switching elements in a three-dimensional modular array. The state of several crosspoints can be changed at the same time by an air pressure control and can be used for I/O channel switching.

Drawing 1 shows the crosspoint itself. It consists of two chambers containing mercury and is provided with a filter at each end allowing air to pass, but restricting mercury to the chamber area. The crosspoint inputs N, E, S, and W are connected to the chamber electrode. The mercury can take two positions inside the chambers. In one position, it performs connection between N and S and between W and E contacts. In the other position, it performs connection between N and E and between W and S, drawing 2. By applying air pressure to the set inlet and if the reset inlet is vented, the switching state of drawing 1 is changed.

The switching array is assembled in levels. Each level corresponds to a switching module made up of sixteen crosspoints as in drawing 3. In the array, set and reset inlets are placed in tubular arrangement. A level can handle a single line from each wit.

The switching is performed on each level. By applying an air pressure to one of these tubular paths and venting its corresponding path, all crosspoints common to the path are placed in the same state, thus permitting change in the state of all the lines making up a cable.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 3 pictures or other non-text...