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Binary Counter Method for Multiplying by a Number Less than One

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094272D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sorg, JH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This apparatus employs binary counter 10 to multiply a binary argument by a specified number less than one. Often, the formatting of record fields on magnetic surfaces requires recording a gap after each record field. The gap has a length which is a fixed percentage, usually 4 to 5%, of the overall record length. A byte counter is required to obtain self formatting control for variable length record fields. The addition of the circuitry shown to the binary byte counter provides a method for calculating the percentage gap.

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Binary Counter Method for Multiplying by a Number Less than One

This apparatus employs binary counter 10 to multiply a binary argument by a specified number less than one. Often, the formatting of record fields on magnetic surfaces requires recording a gap after each record field. The gap has a length which is a fixed percentage, usually 4 to 5%, of the overall record length. A byte counter is required to obtain self formatting control for variable length record fields. The addition of the circuitry shown to the binary byte counter provides a method for calculating the percentage gap.

Counter 10 counts off a variable binary argument by transferring the argument from storage 11 by gates 12 into counter 10 and stepping the latter to zero. Another method transfers the complement of the argument and step counter 10 to an all 1's state.

By employing control circuitry 13, a control signal is applied to the reset input of a specified number N of consecutive low-order positions of counter 10. These low-order positions are thus held in the reset state and the argument from 11 is transferred directly into counter 10 using the same gates 12 as in a straight count-off. Maintaining the low-order positions reset, counter 10 is stepped and the product is counted. The lowest order position not held reset thus acts like a 1's position. The next order acts like a 2's position, etc. This is equivalent to counting 2/n/ times faster than the rate of the basic counter. The resultant c...