Browse Prior Art Database

Core Tester Contact Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094280D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marinelli, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Core 1, to be tested, is carried on the end of probe 2. The latter is rotated incrementally in a plane perpendicular to the plane of the drawing. Probe 2 carries core 1 into and out of a test station so as to allow core 1 to be tested while it is held still momentarily. In the test station, four contacts 3 engage probe 2. Two contacts 3 are connected to a driver that passes test pulses through probe 2 along the axis of core 1. The other two contacts 3 are connected to a detector that senses the effects of the test pulses as they are influenced by the characteristics of core 1.

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Core Tester Contact Assembly

Core 1, to be tested, is carried on the end of probe 2. The latter is rotated incrementally in a plane perpendicular to the plane of the drawing. Probe 2 carries core 1 into and out of a test station so as to allow core 1 to be tested while it is held still momentarily. In the test station, four contacts 3 engage probe
2. Two contacts 3 are connected to a driver that passes test pulses through probe 2 along the axis of core 1. The other two contacts 3 are connected to a detector that senses the effects of the test pulses as they are influenced by the characteristics of core 1.

Each contact 3 is on a piston 4, disposed in an air cylinder 5.

Air pressure in cylinders 5 forces contacts 3 toward a position in the path of travel of probe 2. As the latter moves into the test station, it abuts contacts 3 and moves them outward slightly. Each contact 3 has a rounded corner A that allows probe 2 to cam contacts 3 outwardly. The pneumatic bias forces each contact 3 into good electrical engagement with probe 2. When cores 1 are being tested at high rates, the rapid movement of probe 2 between contacts 3 tends to cause the contacts to bounce. Thus a definite limitation is placed on the maximum rate at which cores 1 can be tested. With this particular contact assembly, the pneumatic biasing, because of its fast recovery rate and self-dampening characteristics, reduces the contact bounce time to as low as one-half a millisecond.

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