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Obtaining Evaporated Metal Patterns on Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094313D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Esch, RP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This method can be used to produce fine intricate patterns, and particularly fine lines, of evaporated metal on substrates. Techniques for obtaining suitable fine line contact patterns involve etching of an evaporated metal coating at somewhat elevated temperatures. Etching procedures are difficult to control on fine line patterns. Etching aluminum silicon or other alloys frequently leaves a residue that is difficult to remove.

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Obtaining Evaporated Metal Patterns on Substrates

This method can be used to produce fine intricate patterns, and particularly fine lines, of evaporated metal on substrates. Techniques for obtaining suitable fine line contact patterns involve etching of an evaporated metal coating at somewhat elevated temperatures. Etching procedures are difficult to control on fine line patterns. Etching aluminum silicon or other alloys frequently leaves a residue that is difficult to remove.

In this method, polymer layer 12 is deposited on substrate 10 from a solution of polyvinylformamide in diethylene chloride, as in A. Layer 14 of photosensitive material is laid over layer 12 and selectively exposed and developed to define the desired pattern 16 as in 13. The substrate is then dipped in diethylene chloride to remove portions of layer 12 underlying pattern 16 in layer 14 as in C. This results in removing portions of layer 12 to thus undercut the edges of pattern 16.

The substrate is postbaked at relatively mild temperatures to dry it out and metal coating 18 is evaporated on the surface as in D. In pattern 16, the coating 18 is deposited directly on substrate 10 in a well-defined manner. The substrate is then subjected to ultrasonics in diethylene chloride at room temperature for several minutes to remove layer 12, overlying photoresist 14, and metal coating 18 as in E. The metal coating 18 deposited directly on substrate 10 is left intact. The method results in a well-define...