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Preparation of Mechanically Hard Spring Like Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094401D
Original Publication Date: 1966-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Freedman, JF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

For many mechanical devices it is necessary to use springs, plates or similar elements, particularly very small in size, to store mechanical energy. The preparation of such parts generally requires many metallurgical steps, such as softening prior to machining and forming, solution treatment and quenching for rehardening, and often an additional annealing step.

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Preparation of Mechanically Hard Spring Like Materials

For many mechanical devices it is necessary to use springs, plates or similar elements, particularly very small in size, to store mechanical energy. The preparation of such parts generally requires many metallurgical steps, such as softening prior to machining and forming, solution treatment and quenching for rehardening, and often an additional annealing step.

The following procedure permits one to obtain spring-like materials, such as used in watches, small electronic equipment, and the like, having extremely high mechanical yield points in a relatively simple operation. The latter process comprises vapor deposition in a vacuum in the range of 10/-5/ mm. of mercury of a nickel-iron alloy admixed with copper.

Nickel-iron alloy 2 is placed in crucible 4 which is heated by an RF heater, not shown. Within vacuum chamber 6 is placed a source of copper 8 in an appropriate crucible 10. The latter is heated by a second RF heater not shown. The shape of the metal part desired is defined by mask 12. Substrate 14 is previously treated with a thin film of greaselike material so that the finally deposited alloy can be removed from substrate 14. By separately controlling the deposition rates of the nickel-iron alloy and the copper, slightly different physical characteristics can be obtained in the element that is ultimately deposited.

Nickel-iron foils having a thickness of 10/-2/ - 10/-3/ mm. and an admixture of 10-15%...