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Measurement of Filtration Resistance on a Paper Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094430D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fritz, JC: AUTHOR

Abstract

An important characteristic of the pulp used in the manufacture of paper is the rate at which water can be removed. This is commonly termed freeness. The reciprocal of freeness can be considered a function of filtration resistance. Accuracy requires that the measurement of this characteristic be made after pulp treatment is complete, preferably in the headbox or on the wire, while the paper mat is actually being formed.

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Measurement of Filtration Resistance on a Paper Machine

An important characteristic of the pulp used in the manufacture of paper is the rate at which water can be removed. This is commonly termed freeness. The reciprocal of freeness can be considered a function of filtration resistance. Accuracy requires that the measurement of this characteristic be made after pulp treatment is complete, preferably in the headbox or on the wire, while the paper mat is actually being formed.

In this system, pulp is fed from a storage tank to headbox 1 so that a constant level is maintained. Slice opening 2 is adjusted to deliver the proper amount of stock to wire 3 and to control formation of the paper mat on the wire. Water drawn through wire 3 is collected in pit 4.

Further removal of water is effected by suction boxes 21... 27. U-gauge 8 measures the vacuum in each box. Water drawn through the suction boxes is collected in seal pit 9. Flow meter 10 measures the outflow of water from pit 9. A shower water stream can be added to pit 9, such stream being measured by flow meter 11. The basis weight for the paper being produced can be determined from a time-correlated sample taken at the output of the machine. It can also be computed directly from measurements taken at the wet end, as taught by Brewster in a paper, "The Role of Digital Computers in Basis Weight Control" presented in June 1963 at the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association Technical Section Process Control Conference in...