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Improved Structure for Making Lippmann Exposures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094439D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schools, RS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The storing of information in a Lippmann film can be accomplished by directing a beam of light of given frequency at a point on a photographic emulsion 1 where a bit of information corresponding to the frequency is to be stored. This light passes through the emulsion and is reflected back by a coating of reflective material 2 on a supporting plate 3. A standing light wave is set up in the emulsion and causes thin layers 4 of silver to be deposited at the antinodes from silver halide contained in the emulsion. The emulsion is then developed to form a film containing thin layers of silver spaced from each other distances depending upon the frequency of the light which formed them.

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Improved Structure for Making Lippmann Exposures

The storing of information in a Lippmann film can be accomplished by directing a beam of light of given frequency at a point on a photographic emulsion 1 where a bit of information corresponding to the frequency is to be stored. This light passes through the emulsion and is reflected back by a coating of reflective material 2 on a supporting plate 3. A standing light wave is set up in the emulsion and causes thin layers 4 of silver to be deposited at the antinodes from silver halide contained in the emulsion. The emulsion is then developed to form a film containing thin layers of silver spaced from each other distances depending upon the frequency of the light which formed them. Normally, in color photography, mercury is placed in contact with the emulsion to act as the reflecting surface during exposure and has to be removed before developing. This is inconvenient and makes it impossible to use desired packaging techniques.

The disadvantages encountered in using mercury can be overcome by placing a metallic coating, such as silver, on a substrate of either glass or polymer film. During development of the emulsion, metallic coating 2 can either be darkened or made transparent chemically. Silver, for example, can be changed to silver chloride by mercuric chloride during bleaching, an inherent step in the normal developing process.

With reflective material 2 removed, darkened or made transparent, layers 4 in the deve...