Browse Prior Art Database

Preoriented Batch Memory Element

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094442D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kopser, FJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Batch-fabricated memory element 10 is preoriented by an applied magnetic field to improve its signal output characteristics. Element 10, shown isometrically at A and in plan at B, is described in an article in the IBM Journal of Research and Development, April 1964, pages 170-176. Briefly, element 10 comprises word conductor 12 which is encompassed by ferrite binder 14. This has an extended portion 16 through which bit conductor 18 passes. In operation, simultaneous energization of conductors 12 and 18 causes area 20 (over their intersection) to attain a predetermined state of magnetization. By subsequently applying a pulse of energy to conductor 12, the magnetic orientation of area 20 can be reset to a reference orientation, thus causing an output signal to be induced onto conductor 18.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Preoriented Batch Memory Element

Batch-fabricated memory element 10 is preoriented by an applied magnetic field to improve its signal output characteristics. Element 10, shown isometrically at A and in plan at B, is described in an article in the IBM Journal of Research and Development, April 1964, pages 170-176. Briefly, element 10 comprises word conductor 12 which is encompassed by ferrite binder 14. This has an extended portion 16 through which bit conductor 18 passes. In operation, simultaneous energization of conductors 12 and 18 causes area 20 (over their intersection) to attain a predetermined state of magnetization. By subsequently applying a pulse of energy to conductor 12, the magnetic orientation of area 20 can be reset to a reference orientation, thus causing an output signal to be induced onto conductor 18.

In the production of elements 10, their overall operation is substantially improved by the application of heavy priming field 21 in the direction of conductor 12 and with a polarity as to oppose the direction of the normal bit fields appearing in area 20. Field 21 is applied simultaneously with the application of a read pulse to conductor 12 (arrow 22). These applied fields combine to cause a helical magnetization of binder 14, and in particular, cause the corner areas of portion 16 to be magnetized in the direction generally indicated by arrows 24 and 26. While subsequent applications of pulses to conductor 12 result in the magnetic reorientation of a majority of binder 14, the word pulses are of such a magnitude as to not reorient the aforementioned corner areas. Remanent domain areas 24 and 26 act to reduce the 0 signal output to a negative quantity rather than a small positive quantity. While these areas also slightly reduce the level of a 1 signal, it is the 0 signal reduction which is important in that sense amplifier discrimination requirements are thus reduced.

The improved operation can be better understood by referring to drawings B and C. Assume that the polarities of the read and write currents are applied to conductor 12 and bit current as applied to conductor 18 are as indicated, by the arrows. To write a 1 into the area above the intersection of conductors 18 and 12, the conductors are energized with opposite polarity pulses 50 and 52, respectively. The resulting flux orientation at the intersection is shown by arrow
30. To read out this bit of...