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Module Marking Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094454D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Benenati, JA: AUTHOR

Abstract

This process permits microminiaturized modules, for example, described in IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Volume 5, No. 6, November 1962, page 15, encapsulated with a normally nonwetting material, to be marked with a module type, run number and fabrication date.

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Module Marking Process

This process permits microminiaturized modules, for example, described in IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Volume 5, No. 6, November 1962, page 15, encapsulated with a normally nonwetting material, to be marked with a module type, run number and fabrication date.

A number of materials for encapsulating microminiaturized modules have poor wetting characteristics which prevent printing on the module suitable identification and fabrication information. One material found to have this characteristic is a silicone rubber which protects encapsulated modules from the various ambient conditions. The silicone rubber is prepared in accordance with instructions issued by the manufacturer. The rubber is mixed with 0. 2% THERMOLITE* 12 by weight for 3 minutes.

Microminiaturized modules are dipped into the rubber in a face down position to cover the surface with the material. The dipped module is partially cured by heating to a temperature of 65 degrees C for approximately 3 hours. The partially cured rubber has a wettable characteristic and readily accepts the printing ink. Thus, each module can be marked or printed with the appropriate information to indicate type number, run number and fabrication date or other desirable information. The printed module is then subjected to final curing which takes place at a temperature of 150 degrees C for 3 hours. This technique is applicable to bonding of other nonwetting materials similar to silicone rubber whic...