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High Speed Division

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094457D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heard, RS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a data processing system, a coded number can be divided at high speed by another number. Such is through the use of steps closely analogous to the steps of the classical pencil and paper technique of division. Particular structural efficiencies are realized when the divisor is equal to or less than the value of the radix of the dividend, that is, when each dividend ordinal is operated upon by a single number.

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High Speed Division

In a data processing system, a coded number can be divided at high speed by another number. Such is through the use of steps closely analogous to the steps of the classical pencil and paper technique of division. Particular structural efficiencies are realized when the divisor is equal to or less than the value of the radix of the dividend, that is, when each dividend ordinal is operated upon by a single number.

Division can be implemented in many existing data processing structures by the use of truth tables. However, properly designed Boolean logic, which is used in conjunction with arithmetic circuits, is an excellent substitute for the use of memory elements as tables. Division is accomplished high-order first with the use of the stored truth table relationships. The divisor in the following example is assumed to be of smaller value than the radix.

Step 1. A divide table is entered which stores every quotient ordinal value and remainder value for the dividend ordinal and a previous remainder value when divided by the selected divisor. Division is high-order first so the previous remainder is zero.

Step 2. The quotient produced in Step 1 is stored or utilized, and the remainder is stored.

Step 3. Step 1 is repeated with inputs comprising the next lower dividend ordinal and the immediately previous remainder.

Further Steps. Step 2 is repeated with the output of step 3. Further steps are repeated in the manner and sequence described above. Division is complet...