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Elimination of Solder Halo and Adhesion on Glassed Wafers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094544D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Totta, PA: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the technology of microelectronic circuits, a passivating glass layer is deposited over an active substrate such as silicon. Conductive contact lands are deposited on it to which a component can be soldered. In such circumstances, solder can intentionally or unintentionally be deposited on the glass itself beyond the area of the land. When firing of a particular component is required, the solder will melt and dewetting the glass and move toward the metallized land areas. However, some of the solder remains behind as tiny droplets. They ultimately react with the glass surface to the extent that removal is impossible.

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Elimination of Solder Halo and Adhesion on Glassed Wafers

In the technology of microelectronic circuits, a passivating glass layer is deposited over an active substrate such as silicon. Conductive contact lands are deposited on it to which a component can be soldered. In such circumstances, solder can intentionally or unintentionally be deposited on the glass itself beyond the area of the land. When firing of a particular component is required, the solder will melt and dewetting the glass and move toward the metallized land areas. However, some of the solder remains behind as tiny droplets. They ultimately react with the glass surface to the extent that removal is impossible.

To achieve complete dewetting, a thin film of a precious metal such as silver, gold or platinum can first be deposited on the glass surface prior to the solder deposition with the result that the dewetting action is enhanced. Furthermore, such precious metals do not react with or bond to the glass and yet dissolve readily in the solder.

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