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Microelectronic Conductive Composition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094617D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sailer, EE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Conductive elements for two-dimensional and integrated circuit applications are provided from a solid solution of noble metals dispersed in a glass matrix. The glass is basically a leadborosilicate with a selective addition of bismuth oxide. Tinnability, adhesion and resistance to metal migration and dendritic growth are enhanced with the bismuth oxide addition.

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Microelectronic Conductive Composition

Conductive elements for two-dimensional and integrated circuit applications are provided from a solid solution of noble metals dispersed in a glass matrix. The glass is basically a leadborosilicate with a selective addition of bismuth oxide. Tinnability, adhesion and resistance to metal migration and dendritic growth are enhanced with the bismuth oxide addition.

In forming these conductive elements, a glass frit is prepared from the oxides of lead, boron, zirconium, titanium, aluminum and silicon in the following proportions: Lead 50% by weight Boron 10% by weight Zirconium 1% by weight Titanium 2% by weight Aluminum 3% by weight Silicon (balance). The frit is passed through a 400-mesh screen and one part by weight of the frit is combined with one to three parts by weight bismuth oxide. Then one part by weight of the glass frit-bismuth oxide mixture is combined with nine parts by weight of noble metal and intimately mixed. For these mixtures, preferred noble metals are platinum and gold, with the ratio of platinum to gold being in the order of about one to four, respectively.

An organic vehicle is then added and the mixture selectively silk screened onto a module, fired to a temperature of about 750 degrees C for about ten minutes, to form a conductive network. Then, resistive, inductive, capacitive or semiconductive thin films are coupled to the network to form a solid state microelectronic circuit.

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