Browse Prior Art Database

Digital Computer Readout System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094663D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Funk, HL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The system utilizes a low-speed, commercially available servo-writing device as an output terminal for a digital computer. As a preliminary operation, the characters and symbols which form the computer output are written one at a time at servo-writer transmitter 10. They are applied through demodulator 12 and sample and quantize circuit 14 to positions in storage medium 16 indicated by CPU18. The X-Y coordinates of an adequate number of samples of each of the characters to permit reproduction of the characters is in this way stored in medium 16.

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Digital Computer Readout System

The system utilizes a low-speed, commercially available servo-writing device as an output terminal for a digital computer. As a preliminary operation, the characters and symbols which form the computer output are written one at a time at servo-writer transmitter 10. They are applied through demodulator 12 and sample and quantize circuit 14 to positions in storage medium 16 indicated by CPU18. The X-Y coordinates of an adequate number of samples of each of the characters to permit reproduction of the characters is in this way stored in medium 16.

If transmitter 10 is of the type which generates a range-azimuth output and it is still desired to store information in X-Y coordinates in storage medium 16, a resolver can be placed between demodulator 12 and circuit 14. Once all of the characters are stored in medium 16, the upper portion of the circuit is not used again.

When it is desired to generate an output message, CPU18 generates a character-identifying code on line 22, a size factor on line 24, and the position coordinates for the character on line 26. The signal on line 22 causes the stored coordinates for the desired character to be applied to divider 28. Here they are divided by the size factor to reproduce the proper size character. The output from divider 28 is applied to adder 30 where the position coordinates of the character are added to the character coordinates. The output from adder 30 is stored in digital buffer 32.

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