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Setting Circuit for a Tunnel Diode Register

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094757D
Original Publication Date: 1965-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berding, AR: AUTHOR

Abstract

The circuit comprising a transistor 10 and a tunnel diode 12 is for setting tunnel diode register to a particular state. The input signal is applied to terminal 14 coupled to the emitter of a transistor 10. The set signal is applied to terminal 16 coupled to the base of transistor 10 through diode 18. Resistor 20 is coupled from a positive voltage source to the base of transistor 10. Resistor 22 is coupled from the collector of transistor 10 to a second positive voltage source. Tunnel diode 12 is coupled between the collector of transistor 10 and ground.

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Setting Circuit for a Tunnel Diode Register

The circuit comprising a transistor 10 and a tunnel diode 12 is for setting tunnel diode register to a particular state. The input signal is applied to terminal 14 coupled to the emitter of a transistor 10. The set signal is applied to terminal 16 coupled to the base of transistor 10 through diode 18. Resistor 20 is coupled from a positive voltage source to the base of transistor 10. Resistor 22 is coupled from the collector of transistor 10 to a second positive voltage source. Tunnel diode 12 is coupled between the collector of transistor 10 and ground.

When a positive voltage is applied to terminal 16, diode 18 is back-biased and the current through resistor 20 flows into the base of transistor 10. If the emitter of transistor 10 is then at ground potential, transistor 10 turns on, thus, drawing current through resistor 22. Conduction of transistor 10 effectively short- circuits the diode 12 bias current from resistor 22 to ground, causing diode 12 to assume its low voltage state.

If the emitter is positive when the set pulse to the base goes positive, the current through resistor 20 flows through the base to collector junction of transistor 10 and adds to the bias current in diode 12. The sum of these currents is chosen to be greater than the diode 12 peak current and, therefore, causes 12 to switch to its high-voltage state. Therefore, regardless of the original state of diode 12, it assumes the state of the input t...