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Non Inverting Pulse Amplifier with Fixed Output Pulse Duration

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094767D
Original Publication Date: 1965-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boden, RC: AUTHOR

Abstract

This circuit uses the charge storage characteristics of a transistor to convert a pulse at its input to an output pulse of a fixed duration. The output pulse is formed at the emitter of transistor T3 and is amplified and inverted by transistor T4. Transistors T1 and T2 are cascaded inverters. Thus, opposite phase signals appear at their collectors in response to circuit inputs applied to the base of T1. The collector of T1 is connected to control the voltage at the collector of T3. The collector of T2 is connected to control the base of T3.

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Non Inverting Pulse Amplifier with Fixed Output Pulse Duration

This circuit uses the charge storage characteristics of a transistor to convert a pulse at its input to an output pulse of a fixed duration. The output pulse is formed at the emitter of transistor T3 and is amplified and inverted by transistor T4. Transistors T1 and T2 are cascaded inverters. Thus, opposite phase signals appear at their collectors in response to circuit inputs applied to the base of T1. The collector of T1 is connected to control the voltage at the collector of T3. The collector of T2 is connected to control the base of T3.

Because of the opposite phase relationship of the collectors of T1 and T2, T3 is switched between two normally nonconducting states. Between input pulses, T1 conducts and keeps the collector of T3 at a low level inhibiting conduction. T2 is nonconducting and keeps the base of T3 at a high level appropriate to provide charge carriers in the junction region. In the other state, the collector of T3 is connected to a high level for conduction but the base is connected to a low level that tends to prevent conduction. However, T3 turns on in response to the carriers stored in its base-emitter junction region. As soon as these carriers are swept out T3 turns off.

T4 inverts the signal at the emitter of T3 so that the output and input are in phase. The output of T4 is connected by a diode to the input of T1. Such assures that T1 remains off throughout the time required to...