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Browse Prior Art Database

Determining Surface Tension of Glasses

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094771D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Burkhardt, PJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method determines the surface tension of glasses by forming beads on fine glass fibers and by weighing and comparing each bead with the diameter of each fiber.

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Determining Surface Tension of Glasses

This method determines the surface tension of glasses by forming beads on fine glass fibers and by weighing and comparing each bead with the diameter of each fiber.

A number of glass fibers are drawn from a melt in diameters ranging from
0.05 mm to 5.0 mm. The selected fiber is heated to a temperature that causes a bead to form at its end. Heating is continued until the bead becomes too large to be supported by the fiber and falls off. The bead is weighed. Either this weight or the ratio of the weight of the bead to the diameter of the fiber is plotted as the ordinate and the diameter of the fiber is plotted as the abscissa. These plots permit the slope at point of inflection of the resultant curve, drawing A, or the peak of the curve, drawing B, to correlate to the surface tension of the glass.

A substantially spherical bead configuration is formed when the bead falls off the fiber. The bead has a diameter that is equal to the diameter of the fiber. Thus, the surface tension is directly proportional to the weight of the glass bead divided by the radius of the fiber.

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