Browse Prior Art Database

Adding Records in a Random Access File

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094795D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buchholz, W: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In a sequentially organized random access file, new records are stored in the file in their proper sequential position. Any record displaced to make room for the addition is inserted in a general overflow area. Each overflowed record is then inserted in its proper sequential position during a reorganization of the data in the file.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Adding Records in a Random Access File

In a sequentially organized random access file, new records are stored in the file in their proper sequential position. Any record displaced to make room for the addition is inserted in a general overflow area. Each overflowed record is then inserted in its proper sequential position during a reorganization of the data in the file.

In a data computing system, which includes the random access file, the operations are performed by a central processing unit (CPU), a data channel connected to the CPU and a control unit for accessing a plurality of storage files. The CPU provides a search command through the data channel and the control unit. The control unit responds to this command to obtain access to the desired storage file and through a data indexing arrangement to a particular record. Without transferring the indexing data to the CPU, the control unit can then retrieve this data record from the file. Acquisition of the sequentially organized data is obtained through a hierarchy of indices. A prime index and a record track index are provided with several intermediate indices between them.

The prime index can be stored in the memory unit of the CPU. When it is, it is searched by the CPU command to provide the address for the next lower level of indexing. The index data stored in the next and succeeding indices is sequentially organized, but is not required to be continuous. Searching through the indices is performed in the co...