Browse Prior Art Database

Circuit for Measuring the Voltage Current Characteristics of a High Impedance Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000094892D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chaney, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The Scanistor is described in detail in the Proceedings of the IEEE, December 1964, Vol. 52, No. 12 on page 1513 in the paper entitled, ''The Scanistor - A Solid-state Image Scanner'' by J. W. Horton, R. Mazza and H. Dym. The Scanistor is a solid state optical scanning device which converts optical images focused on the device into electrical signals which measure the distribution of light intensities on the device. It consists of two bars of semiconductor material of the same conductivity the with discrete dots of the opposite conductivity the of material alloyed or diffused between the layers to form in essence array of spatially oriented back-to-back diodes. The top layer and its associated junctions with the dots form a plurality of photodiodes. The bottom layer and its dot junctions form a plurality of blocking diodes.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Circuit for Measuring the Voltage Current Characteristics of a High Impedance Device

The Scanistor is described in detail in the Proceedings of the IEEE, December 1964, Vol. 52, No. 12 on page 1513 in the paper entitled, ''The Scanistor - A Solid-state Image Scanner'' by J. W. Horton, R. Mazza and H. Dym. The Scanistor is a solid state optical scanning device which converts optical images focused on the device into electrical signals which measure the distribution of light intensities on the device. It consists of two bars of semiconductor material of the same conductivity the with discrete dots of the opposite conductivity the of material alloyed or diffused between the layers to form in essence array of spatially oriented back-to-back diodes. The top layer and its associated junctions with the dots form a plurality of photodiodes. The bottom layer and its dot junctions form a plurality of blocking diodes.

The top layer is thin and has a relatively high resistance such that when a bias voltage is applied across the layer a potential gradient is developed in the layer. Thus, each photodiode has a discrete bias level. When a ramp voltage is applied to the lower layer each diode pair will pass successively through zero potential difference. Since a photodiode exposed to light conducts when back- biased, each diode pair yields an output response in succession which is a measure of the light intensity on it. Since all of the diode pairs are connected in parallel, the output resp...