Browse Prior Art Database

Growth Computers Using Common Hardware and Different Architectures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095022D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bender, RR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

New processor systems development can be based upon use of a common optimized instruction and status code language in different machines providing a range of different speed, structure, etc., characteristics. The alternative, which is described here, is to redevelop several formerly unrelated existing processors, having unrelated instruction formats and program controls, into a group which is related through common hardware features.

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Growth Computers Using Common Hardware and Different Architectures

New processor systems development can be based upon use of a common optimized instruction and status code language in different machines providing a range of different speed, structure, etc., characteristics. The alternative, which is described here, is to redevelop several formerly unrelated existing processors, having unrelated instruction formats and program controls, into a group which is related through common hardware features.

As shown above with reference to the three different types of data processing systems, types A, B and C have different architectural features, i.e., either different instruction sets or data representations or both. A new group of growth systems, types A-X, B-X and C-X, are defined. Each member of the new group contains common hardware including adder circuits, memory, and other elements as in the drawing. In addition, each member contains one or more distinctively different sets of hardware such as A-X, B-X, and C-X controls. These are adapted to be coupled directly to the common hardware either jointly through an Or junction or severally through separate plug-in cables.

A new group evolved in this manner from the specific A, B and C type systems provides substantial improvements in throughput performance for each new type system relative to the corresponding old type system. In addition, properly arranged common hardware circuitry constitutes the bulk, 60% or more, ...