Browse Prior Art Database

Vacuum Conserver for a Multiple Cup Vacuum Platen

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095033D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Andressen, JS: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the vacuum lifting of an object, there can be difficulty due to holes, cracks, creases, etc., in the surface to which the vacuum is being applied. Multiple suction cups solve the problem provided the vacuum force of the cups that are not over the holes, etc., is sufficient to lift the object. Various elaborate methods prevent the loss of vacuum where there is a common vacuum chamber and one or more of the cups is leaking seriously. Shown above is a simple mechanism to accomplish the conservation of the vacuum in the chamber.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 99% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Vacuum Conserver for a Multiple Cup Vacuum Platen

In the vacuum lifting of an object, there can be difficulty due to holes, cracks, creases, etc., in the surface to which the vacuum is being applied. Multiple suction cups solve the problem provided the vacuum force of the cups that are not over the holes, etc., is sufficient to lift the object. Various elaborate methods prevent the loss of vacuum where there is a common vacuum chamber and one or more of the cups is leaking seriously. Shown above is a simple mechanism to accomplish the conservation of the vacuum in the chamber.

Member 10 moves a small distance relative to the platen and in so doing uncovers an orifice. The act of lifting the platen, with vacuum applied, causes member 10 to move. if there is negligible loss of vacuum, and so allow the full vacuum to be applied via the orifice that is uncovered. When not picking up an object, the vacuum holds member 10 as shown and there is only a small amount of air passing through the upper orifice.

When the cup is placed against an object to be picked. if a reasonable vacuum is formed. i. e.. losses escaping by or through the object are less than that pulled through the upper orifice, then cup shaft 10 moves down and uncovers the large orifice allowing full application of the vacuum. If otherwise. then the cup does not adhere but there is only a small loss of vacuum through the small orifice on top of member 10.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures or o...