Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Epitaxially Growing Silicon Carbide

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095165D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schlack, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

The method epitaxially grows silicon carbide, SiC, by pyrolytic decomposition of an incombustible silane. Previously, a silane, e. g., SiH4, and a hydrocarbon, e. g., CH(4), are pyrolytically decomposed for epitaxially growing SiC. However, such silanes are combustible and tend toward self-ignition in the presence of hydrocarbons.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Method of Epitaxially Growing Silicon Carbide

The method epitaxially grows silicon carbide, SiC, by pyrolytic decomposition of an incombustible silane. Previously, a silane, e. g., SiH4, and a hydrocarbon,
e. g., CH(4), are pyrolytically decomposed for epitaxially growing SiC. However, such silanes are combustible and tend toward self-ignition in the presence of hydrocarbons.

Here, incombustible monomethyl silane, CH(3)SiH(3), is introduced into quartz reaction chamber 1 via conduit 2. Silicon carbide single crystal seed wafer 3 is within chamber 1 on graphite block 4. Induction coils 5 energized via terminals 6 by a power source, not shown, heat seed 3. The CH(3)SiH(3) is pyrolytically decomposed in the vicinity of heated seed 3. Released SiC precipitates on seed 3 in the form of an epitaxial layer.

For semiconductor preparation, doping additives such as chromium, boron, aluminum, phosphorous or nitrogen as gaseous compounds, are introduced into chamber 1 via conduit 7. The additives mix with the CH(3)SiH(4) in the vicinity of seed 3. Conitrolled doping of the epitaxially growing layer of silicon carbide is obtained.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]