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Electrode Fabrication in a Reducing Atmosphere

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095198D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Spielberger, RK: AUTHOR

Abstract

Electrodes are formed by applying to and then firing on a ceramic dielectric a conductive metallizing paste of solid constituents mixed with an inert liquid vehicle. The former is a mixture of noble metal particles dispersed in a vitreous flux. The latter binds the particles together and to the dielectric during firing of the paste in an oxidizing atmosphere. Good adhesion and excellent conductivity are obtained by firing in a reducing atmosphere when the paste, which includes a special glass, is employed.

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Electrode Fabrication in a Reducing Atmosphere

Electrodes are formed by applying to and then firing on a ceramic dielectric a conductive metallizing paste of solid constituents mixed with an inert liquid vehicle. The former is a mixture of noble metal particles dispersed in a vitreous flux. The latter binds the particles together and to the dielectric during firing of the paste in an oxidizing atmosphere. Good adhesion and excellent conductivity are obtained by firing in a reducing atmosphere when the paste, which includes a special glass, is employed.

The electrode paste comprises, by weight, 75% of solids and 25% of an inert liquid vehicle composed of a resinous binder, a volatizable solvent and a surfactant. The solids include, by weight, 85% platinum and 15% of a special glass. Another paste includes, by weight, 90% copper and 10% of the same glass.

The glass consists essentially of, in mol percent, 40% of silicon, 5% of aluminum, 5% of barium, 3% of sodium, 0.5% of lithium and the balance oxygen. The paste is applied and then fired at 1000 degrees C. in a reducing atmosphere of 90% nitrogen and 10% hydrogen. There results bright, shiny electrodes with excellent adhesion, conductivity and solderability.

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