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Browse Prior Art Database

Universal Monolithic Circuit and Method of Fabrication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095247D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harding, WE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This universal circuit or master slice includes active and passive elements. These are adapted to be connected into any desired functional circuit. The circuit can be stored for any desired period prior to further processing into a unique circuit. The magnitudes of the passive component can be widely varied. A protective conductive layer protects the circuit while stored.

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Universal Monolithic Circuit and Method of Fabrication

This universal circuit or master slice includes active and passive elements. These are adapted to be connected into any desired functional circuit. The circuit can be stored for any desired period prior to further processing into a unique circuit. The magnitudes of the passive component can be widely varied. A protective conductive layer protects the circuit while stored.

Semiconductor wafer 10 is processed to include a plurality of transistors 12 and diodes 14 by oxide-masking-diffusion techniques. Metal connections 16 are made to the various electrodes by evaporation or other metallization techniques. Glass coating 18 is sputtered or otherwise deposited to overlay connections 16. A paper entitled ``Surface Protection of Silicon Devices with Glass Films'' by J.A. Perri, H.S. Lehman, W.A. Pliskin, and J. Riseman, presented at the Electrochemical Society Symposium, Oct. 2, 1961, Detroit, describes the technique for overlaying the metal connections with glass.

Photolithograph techniques are employed to etch apertures in glass 18 to expose connections 16. A first metal 20, usually resistive, as, for example tantalum or palladium oxide, is deposited by conventional evaporative techniques, over the glass 18 surface to make connections through apertures 19 to connections 16. A final metal coating 22, as for example, copper, silver, or the like, is suitably deposited by evaporative techniques on metal 20. At this po...