Browse Prior Art Database

Peak Detector and Storage System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095285D
Original Publication Date: 1965-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Swearingen, KW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Comparator 10 functions to detect a change in slope of the input signal. When the input signal is going positive, current flows from the comparator input Q to R through resistor 18 to charge capacitor C2 to approximately the input value. When the input signal starts to go negative, C2 is charged to the peak. Under this condition current flows from R to Q through 11 as C2 discharges.

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Peak Detector and Storage System

Comparator 10 functions to detect a change in slope of the input signal. When the input signal is going positive, current flows from the comparator input Q to R through resistor 18 to charge capacitor C2 to approximately the input value. When the input signal starts to go negative, C2 is charged to the peak. Under this condition current flows from R to Q through 11 as C2 discharges.

The analog voltage input signal is stored on capacitor C1 through normally open contact R1A of relay R1. Relay R1 is operated to close contact R1A when the output from comparator 10 is at a positive level. This is because inverter 18 inhibits And 12 from passing a positive signal to Inverter 13. When the output from 10 is at a negative level and the latch formed by negative Or 16 and positive And 17 is in the reset condition, And 12 passes a positive signal to inverter 13. Thus, relay R1 becomes inoperative and contact R1A opens. With R1A open, C1 retains the stored voltage.

Holdover single-shot 14 fires as the output of 10 goes negative. The output of 14 then remains negative for x seconds after its input from 10 goes positive. This enables negative false peaks to be ignored. For example, the negative peak at point A is a false peak. This is because the input signal again goes negative before 14 has a chance to time out. The timeout of 14 is determined by the expected duration of any false peaks. The latch formed by 16 and 17 is set by a minus level f...