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Stabilizer For Chemical Nickel Deposition Bath

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095401D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haddad, MM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Colloidal particles of hydrated nickel compounds begin to form during the useful life of chemical nickel plating baths. These particles are catalytic in nature and grow by the reduction of nickel onto the surfaces of the particles. As these particles grow, an evolution of gas becomes more intense throughout the bath until finally the bath begins to foam excessively. The particles are now large enough to be seen as the characteristic black precipitate of the decomposed bath. The bath in this manner is rendered useless in a very short time.

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Stabilizer For Chemical Nickel Deposition Bath

Colloidal particles of hydrated nickel compounds begin to form during the useful life of chemical nickel plating baths. These particles are catalytic in nature and grow by the reduction of nickel onto the surfaces of the particles. As these particles grow, an evolution of gas becomes more intense throughout the bath until finally the bath begins to foam excessively. The particles are now large enough to be seen as the characteristic black precipitate of the decomposed bath. The bath in this manner is rendered useless in a very short time.

Certain elements or compounds can be absorbed onto the surfaces of the colloidal particles more readily than nickel. The absorption of elements or compounds on the surfaces of the particles reduces or removes the active catalytic sites which cause the spontaneous decomposition of the nickel plating bath.

Carbon monoxide is readily absorbed onto the surfaces of the colloid particles and is effective in preventing the spontaneous decomposition of chemical nickel plating baths without adversely affecting the bath. It is effective in concentrations of about 0.1 parts per million to several hundred parts per million.

The source of the carbon monoxide is preferably the cleavage product of a temperature unstable organic compound which has been added to the bath formulation. The carbon monoxide is gradually released from the compound to the bath at the normal elevated temperature of the pla...