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Browse Prior Art Database

Method For The Preferential Plating Of A Given Surface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095402D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Koretzky, H: AUTHOR

Abstract

Normally, when an article is being electroplated, metal is deposited to a greater or lesser degree on all conducting surfaces. Such is unless some of these surfaces are shielded from the current by non-conducting baffles, conductive thieves or some sort of stop-off material. This plating of all conductive surfaces is not usually a problem, but in some cases it is desirable that certain surfaces receive all or some particular portion of the deposit. This can now be achieved without the use of baffles, thieves or stop-off materials if the substrate is one having a fairly high resistance, such as a cathode which is a single discrete entity or a continuous strip.

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Method For The Preferential Plating Of A Given Surface

Normally, when an article is being electroplated, metal is deposited to a greater or lesser degree on all conducting surfaces. Such is unless some of these surfaces are shielded from the current by non-conducting baffles, conductive thieves or some sort of stop-off material. This plating of all conductive surfaces is not usually a problem, but in some cases it is desirable that certain surfaces receive all or some particular portion of the deposit. This can now be achieved without the use of baffles, thieves or stop-off materials if the substrate is one having a fairly high resistance, such as a cathode which is a single discrete entity or a continuous strip.

The high resistance of the cathode insures that the potential necessary to produce a significant plating current has been dissipated before the plated article reaches the auxiliary electrode system. In the case of a strip cathode, at one end of the bath the substrate is plated by being made cathodic with no regard to the metal distribution, while at the other end the plated substrate is passed between two working electrodes. In this manner, the plated substrate behaves as a bi- polar electrode. The side facing the working anode behaves as a cathode, while the side facing the working cathode behaves anodically. By properly adjusting the potential on this second electrode system, the entire plated layer or any portion of it facing the working cathode can b...