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Measurement Of Peak Current Of Tunnel Diodes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095475D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Croisier, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

On the production line and in trouble shooting, it is often desirable to employ a go or no-go device for determining the peak current of tunnel diodes. One arrangement for rapidly making such measurements is in A. Constant-current source 10 is connected to tunnel diode 11 undergoing test through a noise filter network 12. This comprises seriesconnected, high-frequency choke coil 13 and shunt capacitor 14. One terminal of the latter connects to grounded shield 15 for diode 11. Highresistance voltmeter 16 of an electronic type connects across the output terminals of source 10 as are also mercury-wetted contacts 17 of relay 18. The latter is energized from a periodic source so that the contacts 17 close for about one millisecond at about 100 times per second.

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Measurement Of Peak Current Of Tunnel Diodes

On the production line and in trouble shooting, it is often desirable to employ a go or no-go device for determining the peak current of tunnel diodes. One arrangement for rapidly making such measurements is in A. Constant-current source 10 is connected to tunnel diode 11 undergoing test through a noise filter network 12. This comprises seriesconnected, high-frequency choke coil 13 and shunt capacitor 14.

One terminal of the latter connects to grounded shield 15 for diode
11. Highresistance voltmeter 16 of an electronic type connects across the output terminals of source 10 as are also mercury-wetted contacts 17 of relay 18. The latter is energized from a periodic source so that the contacts 17 close for about one millisecond at about 100 times per second.

Meter 16 measures the voltage appearing across the terminals of source 10. This voltage has two different values depending upon the magnitude of the peak current of diode 11. If the peak current of diode 11 is lower than that delivered by source 10, diode 11 swings to its high-voltage state. This is when the relay contacts 17 are open and at a speed determined by the time constant of filter network 12. Operation under those conditions is such that the average voltage indicated by voltmeter 16 is high.

On the other hand, if the peak current of diode 11 is higher than the current delivered by source 10, diode 11 remains in its low-voltage state. That is, the voltage appearing across diode 11 is less than its peak voltage. Should an exceptionally strong random noise pulse cause diode 11 to swing momentarily to its high-voltage state, it remains thus only until the next closing of the relay contacts 17. If voltmeter 16 is sufficiently damped, it does not indicate...