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Chemical Deposition of Nickel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095490D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wright, RH: AUTHOR

Abstract

The chemical deposition of nickel from a plating bath maintained at a low temperature is required where the substrate is composed of a low melting material. The following formulation is an example of such a low temperature chemical plating bath: Nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NiSO(4) . 6H(2)O) 18. 4 grams/liter Sodium hypophosphite mono- (NaH(2)PO(2). H(2)O) 24. 4 grams/liter hydrate Acetic acid (CH(3)COOH) 3. 6 grams/liter Sodium acetate (NaC(2)H(3)O(2)) 4. 8 grams/liter Lactic acid (85%) Sp. G. = 1. 2 (CH(3) CHOHCOOH) 31 grams/liter Sodium succinate hexahydrate (Na(2)C(4)H(4)O(4). 6H(2)O) 16.2 grams/liter Lead ion (Pb/++/) 1-10 ppm pH (adjusted with sodium 5. 2 +/- 0. 6 hydroxide NaOH).

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Chemical Deposition of Nickel

The chemical deposition of nickel from a plating bath maintained at a low temperature is required where the substrate is composed of a low melting material. The following formulation is an example of such a low temperature chemical plating bath: Nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NiSO(4) . 6H(2)O) 18. 4 grams/liter Sodium hypophosphite mono- (NaH(2)PO(2). H(2)O) 24. 4 grams/liter hydrate Acetic acid (CH(3)COOH) 3. 6 grams/liter Sodium acetate (NaC(2)H(3)O(2)) 4. 8 grams/liter Lactic acid (85%) Sp. G. = 1. 2 (CH(3) CHOHCOOH) 31 grams/liter Sodium succinate hexahydrate (Na(2)C(4)H(4)O(4). 6H(2)O) 16.2 grams/liter Lead ion (Pb/++/) 1-10 ppm pH (adjusted with sodium 5. 2 +/- 0. 6 hydroxide NaOH).

The combination of the acetate, lactate and succinate anions in the acid chemical deposition bath allows the plating of nickel on a palladium activated surface at comparatively low temperatures in the order of 100 degrees to 130 degrees F. The bath gives a slow but acceptable plating rate when operated at the low temperatures, and a rate of 1. 5 mils per hour when the bath is maintained at 210 degrees F. The depletion of the lactate anion by as much as 30% does not change the plating rate because the plating bath is buffered with the acetate and exalted with succinate anions.

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