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Pressure Photography

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095494D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ladd, RS: AUTHOR

Abstract

The article ``Fine Line Art Work Generation'' by F. C. Brammer and K. T. Knapp, IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 6, November 1962, page 22, describes a technique by which fine line photographic patterns may be produced by pressure marking of a photographic emulsion on a glass plate. A somewhat different, although related phenomenon can be employed to reproduce topographical characteristics of a surface.

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Pressure Photography

The article ``Fine Line Art Work Generation'' by F. C. Brammer and K. T. Knapp, IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 6, November 1962, page 22, describes a technique by which fine line photographic patterns may be produced by pressure marking of a photographic emulsion on a glass plate. A somewhat different, although related phenomenon can be employed to reproduce topographical characteristics of a surface.

The exact topography of any surface may be photographically reproduced without light exposure by pressing the emulsion containing surface of a normal photographic film against the surface. This is after having first activated the emulsion by wetting it with a developer. The pressure image thus produced may be made visible by normal developing and fixing techniques.

The tonal gradations produced by this technique are directly proportional to the amount of pressure applied. Thus, surface projections are reproduced as darker (less transparent) areas on the film.

The period of pre-development or wetting of the film is not extremely critical, nor is it necessary to exert extreme force to create the pressure image. A standard photographic film containing a silver emulsion immersed for about 30 seconds in developer fluid and manually pressed against an object for another 30 seconds retains a sharp and high quality image of the topographical characteristic of the object. Surface contours and textures as fine as the texture of this paper...