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Method for Determining Tape Wear

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095500D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Speliotis, DE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The wearing of metallic magnetic tape is one of the most important considerations concerning satisfactory performance. A direct determination of surface wear and scratches is accomplished by continuously monitoring the remanence of the wearing magnetic tape.

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Method for Determining Tape Wear

The wearing of metallic magnetic tape is one of the most important considerations concerning satisfactory performance. A direct determination of surface wear and scratches is accomplished by continuously monitoring the remanence of the wearing magnetic tape.

The section of tape to be examined is first magnetized to saturation in the plane of the tape and transversely to the tape's long direction. The tape is then inserted into a wear apparatus. This wear apparatus may utilize, for example, an abrasive tape, abrasive powder, or actual magnetic head with or without lubrication to cause the abrasion of the tape. The wearing of the tape is measured magnetically by continuously monitoring the magnetic remanence of the surface. A vibrating coil magnetometer is used to measure the magnetic remanence, since there is no external magnetic field present.

Two vibrating coils are preferably used because the critical balancing, necessary when one coil is used, is eliminated. A Hall probe can be used as an alternate to the vibrating coil magnetometer.

The remanent moment of the sample section of tape is simultaneously monitored in at least two positions to discriminate scratches from regular surface wear. The magnetic remanence results are preferably automatically displayed through a recorder. Scratches in the ferromagnetic metallic surface are readily seen by the discontinuous change in the recorded remanence when a scratch is encountered.

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