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Glass which is Conductive in Selected Areas

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095516D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Narkin, B: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Glass for encapsulating electrical components can be provided with selected areas that are conductive for the purpose of making electrical connections. The type of glass employed as the encapsulating medium is chosen on the basis of its coefficient of expansion and melting temperature. This glass is ground to a powder and then a paste or slurry is made of the ground glass and pine oil. To this is added 10-20% of a solution comprising 2 parts of alcohol to 1 part of water. The consistency of the paste depends upon whether it is to be applied to the component by spraying, centrifuging or doctor blading. After the paste has been applied, the unit is held at a temperature of about 100 degrees C and the paste is dried slowly.

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Glass which is Conductive in Selected Areas

Glass for encapsulating electrical components can be provided with selected areas that are conductive for the purpose of making electrical connections. The type of glass employed as the encapsulating medium is chosen on the basis of its coefficient of expansion and melting temperature. This glass is ground to a powder and then a paste or slurry is made of the ground glass and pine oil.

To this is added 10-20% of a solution comprising 2 parts of alcohol to 1 part of water. The consistency of the paste depends upon whether it is to be applied to the component by spraying, centrifuging or doctor blading. After the paste has been applied, the unit is held at a temperature of about 100 degrees C and the paste is dried slowly.

At selected areas where conductivity is desired, the glass is rewetted with a stannic chloride solution made from lumps of stannic chloride (SnCl(4). 5H(2)O) dissolved in a liquid comprising 1 part of water and 2 parts of ethyl alcohol. The treated areas are dried and then the unit is fired at a temperature sufficiently high to fuse the glass into a continuous impervious jacket. The amount of stannic chloride dissolved in the liquid and also the thickness of the glass layer controls the conductivity of the selected glass areas.

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