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Double Diffused Injection Laser Structure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095544D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dumke, WP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Manganese in gallium arsenide gives rise to an acceptor level 0. 1 ev away from the valence band. These manganese levels give rise to a laser transition in gallium arsenide similar to the one involving zinc, but with the following differences. First, the energy of the line is at 1. 41 ev at 77 degrees Kelvin which incidentally results in less reabsorption. Secondly, the levels remain filled with holes at a higher temperature than in zinc-doped gallium arsenide with the consequence that a room temperature injection laser is realized.

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Double Diffused Injection Laser Structure

Manganese in gallium arsenide gives rise to an acceptor level 0. 1 ev away from the valence band. These manganese levels give rise to a laser transition in gallium arsenide similar to the one involving zinc, but with the following differences. First, the energy of the line is at 1. 41 ev at 77 degrees Kelvin which incidentally results in less reabsorption. Secondly, the levels remain filled with holes at a higher temperature than in zinc-doped gallium arsenide with the consequence that a room temperature injection laser is realized.

In fabrication of the laser, the slow, deep, relatively low level diffusion of the manganese into n type gallium arsenide is followed by a shallow high level diffusion with zinc or cadmium. This is in order to have a p/+/ layer from which to inject holes into the fairly high resistivity manganese diffused layer. An incidental advantage of such a double diffusion technique is the better control of the doping levels on the p type side of the junction.

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