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Browse Prior Art Database

Laser Pumping Cavity

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095647D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carlough, W: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

When pumping energy impinges on an active lasing element, only a relatively minor percent (20%) of the energy is absorbed. The preponderance of the energy passes through the laser and is either lost or reflected back to the lamp contributing to its heating. In the cavities shown, trapping of the light rays is employed to recover the unabsorbed pumping energy, by redirecting it back into the active laser material for multiple absorptions. Despite the multiple reflections from the cavity walls, the reflection losses are more than offset by the increased absorption, resulting in a material over-all increase in efficiency.

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Laser Pumping Cavity

When pumping energy impinges on an active lasing element, only a relatively minor percent (20%) of the energy is absorbed. The preponderance of the energy passes through the laser and is either lost or reflected back to the lamp contributing to its heating. In the cavities shown, trapping of the light rays is employed to recover the unabsorbed pumping energy, by redirecting it back into the active laser material for multiple absorptions. Despite the multiple reflections from the cavity walls, the reflection losses are more than offset by the increased absorption, resulting in a material over-all increase in efficiency.

Cavity A consists of a hollow cylindrical reflecting surface 10, closed at one end by the external surface of a coaxially disposed cone 11, and at the other end by the internal surface of a second coaxially disposed cone 12. The lamp 13, located coaxially within the conical surface 12 emits light, which by multiple reflections is directed to and trapped within the re-entrant cavity formed by the intersection of the surfaces 10 and 11. The fiber laser 14, e.g., neodymium doped glass, lying within this re-entrant cavity receives all of the pumping energy not lost in reflections.

In cavity 13, the same effect is achieved, with the variation that the surface 22 instead of being conical is spherical, thus collimating any light originating at its focus.

In both devices, the stimulated emission from the fiber laser is piped outside of...