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Radar Clearance Plane Position Detection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095687D
Original Publication Date: 1964-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Shoultes, RC: AUTHOR

Abstract

In advanced types of low flying aircraft, there is conventional radar apparatus available for supplying a visual indication of the terrain forwardly and sidewardly of the aircraft. Such terrain avoidance radar computes and displays terrain height relative to a preselected clearance plane located beneath the aircraft. For a craft 10 moving along path 11 parallel to the ground, the clearance plane appears as plane 12. This is substantially parallel to both the ground plane and craft 10. If, through equipment failure or other malfunction, the clearance plane should be tipped to a position as at 12', a surface object such as mountain 13 would be displayed it a lower height due to the malfunction and might, in fact, be noted too late to permit evasive action.

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Radar Clearance Plane Position Detection

In advanced types of low flying aircraft, there is conventional radar apparatus available for supplying a visual indication of the terrain forwardly and sidewardly of the aircraft. Such terrain avoidance radar computes and displays terrain height relative to a preselected clearance plane located beneath the aircraft. For a craft 10 moving along path 11 parallel to the ground, the clearance plane appears as plane 12. This is substantially parallel to both the ground plane and craft 10. If, through equipment failure or other malfunction, the clearance plane should be tipped to a position as at 12', a surface object such as mountain 13 would be displayed it a lower height due to the malfunction and might, in fact, be noted too late to permit evasive action. Similarly, disorientation of the clearance plane to a position 12'' would make viewed objects appear much higher than they actually are, requiring craft 10 to travel at a correspondingly higher altitude. The technique described here enables determination of the actual disposition of the clearance plane during use and correction of any errors so detected.

The radar apparatus is presented with two test problems the solutions of which, if the apparatus is correctly operating, correspond to two points located on the clearance plane at ranges of R1 and R2, respectively. These solutions are not generally found positioned exactly on the desired clearance plane, but rather displac...