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Nonsaturating Transistor Trigger Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095715D
Original Publication Date: 1964-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Trampel, KM: AUTHOR

Abstract

The trigger circuit employs transistor s operable in non- saturating manner. Such an arrangement realizes enhanced operating speeds. The circuit receives input signals at points A and B, and provides an output signal at point X representative of its state. Assuming that transistor 1 is conducting, transistor 2 is also conducting, because transistor 1 is a current sink to point 4 for transistor 2. When the emitter of transistor 2 approaches -V1 voltage, diode 5 becomes conducting and clamps the base of transistor 2, thus preventing saturation.

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Nonsaturating Transistor Trigger Circuit

The trigger circuit employs transistor s operable in non- saturating manner. Such an arrangement realizes enhanced operating speeds. The circuit receives input signals at points A and B, and provides an output signal at point X representative of its state. Assuming that transistor 1 is conducting, transistor 2 is also conducting, because transistor 1 is a current sink to point 4 for transistor 2. When the emitter of transistor 2 approaches -V1 voltage, diode 5 becomes conducting and clamps the base of transistor 2, thus preventing saturation.

In the meantime, transistor 3 is not conducting and the voltage at point X through resistor 6 holds transistor 1 in conduction. Transistor 1 is also not saturated because the current in it is the same as in transistor 2. To switch the circuit, a suitable current pulse is applied at point A. Transistors 1 and 2 are rendered nonconductive.

Now the emitter of transistor 2 approaches ground voltage, and diode 7 becomes conductive clamping the base of transistor 3 at a voltage which allows conduction but not saturation. Voltage at point X is reduced and holds transistor 1 non-conducting. A current pulse at point B acts as a current sink for transistor 2, switching the circuit to its original state by making, for the duration of the pulse, transistor 2 conducting. This, in turn, terminates conduction of transistor 3, which, via the feedback, initiates conduction of transistor 1.

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