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Infrared Energy Detector and Method of Making

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095719D
Original Publication Date: 1964-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DeGroat, PM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Thin films viewed by reflected light exhibit interference patterns that have a functional relationship to the thickness of the films. Impingement of infrared radiation onto such a film constructed of an elastomeric material produces a localized change in thickness of the film which effects a corresponding shift of the interference pattern. This phenomenon is utilized to provide a highly sensitive device for detection of infrared energy.

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Infrared Energy Detector and Method of Making

Thin films viewed by reflected light exhibit interference patterns that have a functional relationship to the thickness of the films. Impingement of infrared radiation onto such a film constructed of an elastomeric material produces a localized change in thickness of the film which effects a corresponding shift of the interference pattern. This phenomenon is utilized to provide a highly sensitive device for detection of infrared energy.

The method, described here, provides a self-supporting elastomeric sheet, or film, having a thickness in the range of 400-1000 angstroms which exhibits an exceptionally fast response to low level amounts of incident infrared radiation. First, a relatively thin film of the elastomer is formed on a flat substrate, e. g., by casting or electrodeposition. Next, the film, while still on the substrate, is vulcanized by exposing it to sulfur monochloride vapor for approximately 30 seconds. The film is then removed from the substrate, mounted onto a frame and set to a state of slight tension by subjecting it to stretching forces directed along different lines of application.

Exposure of the stretched film to a radiant heat source is effected for sufficient time to raise the temperature of the film to the point where a slight wetting condition is observed. The area exhibiting the wetting is subjected to further stretching forces until it is approximately four times its original area. Additional...