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High Density Tape Print Recording

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095809D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoffman, HS: AUTHOR

Abstract

The physical problems of making recording heads very small as well as the fringing flux associated with such heads cause the area of a tape, required to record one bit of data, to be very wide compared to its dimension along the track. Because the resolution of the magnetic tape is the same in both directions, it is desirable, in order to achieve maximum density, to have the area of the recorded bit be a square whose side is no longer than the along-the-track dimension of such recorded bit.

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High Density Tape Print Recording

The physical problems of making recording heads very small as well as the fringing flux associated with such heads cause the area of a tape, required to record one bit of data, to be very wide compared to its dimension along the track. Because the resolution of the magnetic tape is the same in both directions, it is desirable, in order to achieve maximum density, to have the area of the recorded bit be a square whose side is no longer than the along-the-track dimension of such recorded bit.

Such high density recording is achieved by applying, as seen in A, via a magnetic head 2, a biasing magnetic field that is normal to the surfaces of two superimposed tapes 4 and 6. Tape 6 is the permanent tape having the rectangular bits and tape 4 is the tape to or from which the bits, when transferred, will be square. To achieve such high density transfer, tape 6 is moved to the right (see arrow 8) at right angles to the motion of tape 4 (see arrow 10), tape 6 moving much faster than tape 4.

In B, there is a showing of the relationship among the orthogonal transfer head 2, the horizontal bits on tape 6 and the bits transferred to the vertical tape
4. If the horizontal speed of tape 6 is approximately one hundred times the vertical speed of tape 4, then the heads 2 are actuated for a time that is one- tenth of the time that the horizontal tape moves from one bit to an adjacent bit on tape 6. The actuation of a single head 2 thus simultaneousl...