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Phase Splitter and Integrator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095844D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Greeson, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

A signal applied to input terminal 10 is integrated by first rectifying the positive going portion of the signal and both inverting and rectifying the negative portion. Transistor T1 functions as a paraphrase amplifier. The emitter and collector outputs of T1 are applied to the bases of transistors T2 and T3, respectively, which are connected as zero-biased emitter followers.

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Phase Splitter and Integrator

A signal applied to input terminal 10 is integrated by first rectifying the positive going portion of the signal and both inverting and rectifying the negative portion. Transistor T1 functions as a paraphrase amplifier. The emitter and collector outputs of T1 are applied to the bases of transistors T2 and T3, respectively, which are connected as zero-biased emitter followers.

The long time constant necessary for integration is obtained through the collector circuit of transistors T4 and T5. The charges placed upon the integrator capacitors 11 and 12 are determined by the large emitter resistors 13 and 14. Thus, the positive going signals are applied to common base transistors with the integrating capacitors in the collector circuits of them. The large output impedances of the common base transistors makes it possible to use small capacitors for integration. The use of small capacitors permits rapid discharge which is desirable in many instances.

Large emitter resistances 13 and 14 approximate a current source for the integrator output circuit. Since both outputs are positive going, a differential amplifier can be used to compare the amplitudes of them.

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