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Relative Magnitude Detector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000095847D
Original Publication Date: 1964-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Horwitz, LP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The system gives an indication of the relative magnitude of a group of signals. If a plurality of different amplitude signals are present on the input leads of the device, signals appear sequentially in time on the output leads. The output lead which corresponds to the highest voltage input is energized first, the output lead corresponding to the next highest voltage input following, and so on. When all the output leads have been energized, a new cycle is initiated.

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Relative Magnitude Detector

The system gives an indication of the relative magnitude of a group of signals. If a plurality of different amplitude signals are present on the input leads of the device, signals appear sequentially in time on the output leads. The output lead which corresponds to the highest voltage input is energized first, the output lead corresponding to the next highest voltage input following, and so on. When all the output leads have been energized, a new cycle is initiated.

Input voltages E1... EN are each applied to a current path which includes relay 1 and diode 2. The currents in all paths flow through common impedance
3. The highest applied voltage causes current to flow through the corresponding relay 1 and diode 3. The voltage developed across impedance 3, because of this current flow, back-biases diodes 2 in the other current paths. The relay through which current flows is operated, causing its contacts 4 to be switched, resulting in: 1) removal of ground from the intersection of resistors 5 and 6, causing a positive voltage to appear at the corresponding output lead, and 2) grounding the right side of the operated relay, maintaining a path for relay current which bypasses common impedance 3.

At this time, the next-highest applied voltage causes the same action in its channel and producing an output signal. In this manner, output signals are sequentially generated in the order of the applied voltage magnitudes. At the termination of the...